Tsunami debris hits Oregon early, bringing alien species

NPR has some of the best stories on the huge dock that traveled from Japan to wash up on Agate Beach, near Newport, Oregon, 15 months after the devastating tsunami.

Here’s one from AP, which details painstaking efforts made to remove alien species that arrived with the 70-foot dock and that might gain a foothold and threaten native seaweed and shellfish. A similar story about scouring and even blowtorching the metal to remove the aliens that aired on NPR (and you can listen to it as well) has residents suggesting that the dock may attract tourists to the Newport area.

My favorite story, from All Things Considered on June 19, tells what it’s like to patrol the beach in Oregon or Washington, watching for plastic bottles with Japanese writing. The reporter, Martin Kaste, quotes Carey Morishige, Pacific Islands coordinator of NOAA’s marine debris program, who works out of Honolulu and does a very big job with a very small staff (and the North Pacific is a very big place). The best description of the dock with its hitchhiking species is by an Oregon State University biologist specializing in invasive species; he calls it “an island that had drifted across from Asia.” This metaphorical island came with real residents, however, and unwelcome ones judging by the hostility of their reception.

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